Assistive Technology Center at College of San Mateo - Writing with your Voice
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Assistive Technology Center

Writing with your Voice

The basic principles of writing are the same regardless of whether you are using your voice, the keyboard, or a pencil and paper. There is a process that most writers follow in order to produce quality writing. You can become a better writer by:
  • Choosing your topic.
  • Researching and organizing your topic.
  • Analyzing your writing in terms of audience, purpose, personality, and length.
  • Writing a first draft.
  • Proofreading, correcting, and editing your document.
  • Publishing a final draft.
  • Processing what others say about your writing.

Choosing a Topic


Sometimes you will simply be assigned a topic, either at school or on the job. But isn't it great when you can choose a topic of your own? Whenever you have the chance to write about what truly interests you, don't waste the opportunity.

There are many ways to choose a good topic. Brainstorming is a good way to get the ideas flowing. Brainstorming with your voice is easy. Simply say what comes into your mind. You may choose to organize your thoughts by creating a list using bullets or by double spacing between thoughts and ideas.

Researching and Organizing your Topic


The World Wide Web has become the research tool of choice for most writers. However, newspapers, magazines, books, movies and documentaries, and other multimedia sources, such as CD-ROMs, are also good sources of information.

As you learn more about your topic, use your voice dictation software to keep notes. As you learn something new about your topic, dictate it into the computer. Correct your errors as you go, and you will be training your computer to be more accurate when you actually begin dictating your report later. If you train any new words you encounter at this early stage, you will be able to use these words correctly as you voice- type your report.

At some point, you will understand your topic very well. At this stage, you should start to outline what you are going to be writing about. An outline will help you organize your thoughts, notes, and research material. An outline will also help you dictate your document